What are the coronavirus restrictions in Tenerife, Lanzarote and Gran Canaria if I do go on holiday?

THOUSANDS of Brits are heading to the Canary Islands, after the UK government opened a travel corridor with the area last week.

But travellers who've booked a trip now the UK government has lifted its 14-day quarantine rule on their return will still have to follow special measures to avoid the spread of coronavirus.

The Canary Islands as a whole have the lowest rate of coronavirus in Spain, so they have avoided the new state of emergency announced yesterday by Spanish PM Pedro Sanchez.

The Canary government has its own "traffic light" system which indicates the level of precautions needed on the individual islands, dependent on the rate of Covid-19 infections.

Tenerife was put on red alert on September 26 because of raised Covid figures and this alert has now been extended until November 6.

All of the other islands, including Lanzarote, Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura, are on the low alert of green although restrictions still exist.

Read on to find out what that means on each island.

Tenerife (red alert)

In hotels, restaurants, terraces and beach bars, the closing time is  midnight maximum, with no new clients after 11pm. 

Everyone, including tourists, must wear face masks, indoors and out, and on the beaches and around swimming pools if moving around (but not if swimming).

Nightclubs remain closed.

There are also tight regulations on where you can or cannot smoke and social distancing still has to be observed.

Mass events or acts are also banned, ie those of more than ten people, with the exception of the celebration of ordinary scheduled public cultural activity.

In the most recent figures released by the Ministry of Health of the Government of the Canary Islands yesterday, Tenerife reported 78 new Covid cases over the previous 24 hours.

Lanzarote, Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (green alert)

The green alert means that bars and restaurants can stay open until 1am, with no new customers after midnight.

Nightclubs still remain closed.

The health department advises people socialise within their own groups and recommends a maximum of ten people in a group, but it is not an order.

Everyone, including tourists, must still wear face masks, indoors and out, and on the beaches and around swimming pools if moving around (but not if swimming).

There are also still tight regulations on where you can or cannot smoke.

In the most recent figures released yesterday, Gran Canaria reported 70 new Covid cases over the previous 24 hours, Lanzarote reported one case, Fuerteventura 14 cases and La Palma no new cases.

For Brits looking to travel to the Canary Islands, there are a number of deals to be had, as companies try to fill empty plane seats and hotel rooms after a quiet few months.

  • Seven nights in the Canary Islands with easyJet Holidays – from £207pp
  • Seven nights in the Canary Islands with Jet2 Holidays – from £299pp
  • Seven nights in Fuerteventura with TUI – from £309pp
  • Seven nights 4* bed & breakfast in the Canary Islands with easyJet Holidays – from £314pp
  • Seven nights in Gran Canaria with TUI – from £369pp
  • Seven nights in Tenerife with TUI – from £385pp
  • Seven nights all-inclusive in the Canary Islands with Jet2 Holidays – from £435pp

Regional Tourism Secretary Yaiza Castilla said the removal of the Canary Islands quarantine was "magnificent news" and that airlines and tour operators are now scrambling to offer more holidays, with prices expected to rise due to demand.

TUI has relaunched holidays to the Canary Islands, along with Jet2 and easyJet.

Jet2 sold more than 5,500 holidays to the Canaries just hours after the announcement, according to Head of trade Alan Cross, while easyJet added another 180,000 seats after demand soared by 500 per cent.

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