New Orleans is ranked best city in the world, Las Vegas is the worst

New Orleans is ranked the best city for a long-haul break in a Which? survey, with Singapore and Sydney joint second while Las Vegas is voted the worst

  • Visitors praised New Orleans for its nightlife, friendliness and fusion cuisine
  • Singapore got 5 stars for shopping and Sydney got 5 for ease of getting around
  • Las Vegas came bottom with two stars for food and drink and value for money

Britons have rated New Orleans as the best long-haul city in the world to visit, beating popular destinations such as Dubai, Miami and Tokyo in a new Which? survey.

The consumer champion asked over 2,000 holidaymakers to rate recent trips to cities around the world across a range of categories – the quality of the cultural attractions, accommodation, shopping, food, value for money and, crucially, how crowded it was.

Joint second in the ranking was Singapore and Sydney while Las Vegas was voted the worst. 

Britons have rated New Orleans, pictured, as the best long-haul city in the world to visit, beating popular destinations such as Dubai, Miami and Tokyo in a new Which? survey

New Orleans is the birthplace of jazz and hosts more than 130 festivals a year, including its famous Jazz Fest

The swampland that surrounds New Orleans is eerily beautiful and boat rides to spot alligators are one of the city’s most popular attractions

Cape Town had been the top long-haul city for four of the past five years as voted for by Which? members. But this year, New Orleans was top of the ranking of 39 destinations for the first time ever with a city score of 90 per cent. 

Those surveyed told Which? they loved ‘the Big Easy’ for its laid-back nature, friendly locals, fusion cuisine and the ease of getting around.

Based on the Mississippi River, the city also got a five-star rating for the quality of its attractions – which includes live music and around-the-clock nightlife, as well as airboat rides in the bayou to spot alligators.

Joint-second place Singapore was the highest-rated destination in Asia with an 87 per cent city score. 

The island city-state was one of only three cities to receive five stars for shopping. It was also rated five stars for ease of getting around and its food and drink offering.

With its mix of Cantonese, Indian and Malay food at bargain food markets, iconic double helix bridge and endless malls, boutiques and high street chains, travellers are also spoilt for choice for places to visit and things to do. 

Singapore, pictured, was the highest-rated destination in Asia and one of only three cities to receive five stars for shopping

Sydney earned a city score of 87 per cent beating rivals Melbourne and Perth. It got five stars for ease of getting around

In fourth place was Chicago, pictured, with a city score of 86 per cent. It earned five stars for its tourist attractions as well as ease of getting around

Which?’s table of 39 long-haul destinations, ranked by more than 2,000 travellers

One holidaymaker told Which? Singapore ‘has so many attractions, it is difficult to pick one out’.

Sydney also earned a city score of 87 per cent beating rivals Melbourne and Perth.

Australia’s largest city is best known for its iconic Opera House, yacht-studded harbour and famous Bondi beach. 

Those surveyed told Which? it was easy to get around, earning it five stars in this category, with many also recommending the ferry to the beach-side suburb of Manly and back for the best view of the city.

In fourth place was Chicago with a city score of 86 per cent. It earned five stars for its tourist attractions as well as ease of getting around.  

Tokyo’s mix of urban attractions and historic temples earned it fifth place in Which?’s survey

Cape Town, which topped the list for four years running, was knocked off the top spot by New Orleans, but still received the coveted five-star rating for value for money

Coming in joint fifth, Tokyo (85 per cent), Japan’s capital, mixes neon-lit skyscrapers and historic temples. 

It also proved hugely popular and was the city that received the most five stars in a range of categories including shopping, attractions, ease of getting around and food and drink. One visitor described Tokyo as ‘an amazing city and spotlessly clean.’

It shared fifth place with both Jaipur in India and Washington D.C.  

Former winner Cape Town still managed an 84 per cent city score and received the coveted five-star rating for value for money – something only Shanghai, Jaipur and Hanoi could match.

Those who visited told Which? about stunning views at Table Mountain, plentiful vineyards and great bars and restaurants in the harbour.

Travellers surveyed by Which? found Las Vegas to be ‘brash’, ‘expensive’ and ‘over the top’

At the bottom of the list was ‘Sin City’, the city of Las Vegas, which only scraped together a 57 per cent city score. 

Those who visited the Nevada hotspot found it crowded with a lack of attractions, and described it at ‘brash’, ‘expensive’ and ‘over the top’. 

Its paltry two stars for food and drink and value for money was also the joint lowest in the survey.

Also deemed to be disappointing, overrated and crowded was Los Angeles (58 per cent). 

One respondent described the Californian City of Angels as ‘busy, dirty, smelly and dangerous’. It was one of only three cities to receive one star for ease of getting around.

A lack of public transport meant Los Angeles only received one star for ease of getting around

Dubai came in as fourth lowest in the Which? survey of best long-haul destinations and was deemed ‘bling’ by visitors

Known for luxury shopping and ultramodern architecture, Dubai in the United Arab Emirates came in as fourth lowest with a mediocre 62 per cent city score.

Those who visited told Which? they didn’t think much of the food or the attractions and thought it offered poor value for money. One respondent summed up their experience of the city as ‘bling and consumerism’. 

Rory Boland, the travel editor at Which?, said: ‘What the destinations at the top of our survey all have in common is visitors thought they were fantastic value for money, which may not mean cheap – New Orleans certainly isn’t – but that the food, the accommodation and the attractions were well worth the money spent on them.

‘And poor value for money is what Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Dubai all share. It doesn’t matter if you have Universal Studios, Celine Dion shows or the world’s tallest building when visitors feel like they are being ripped off.’

Source: Read Full Article