The sharp-dressed star among the Rolling Stones ragamuffins

The sharply dressed drummer who was a cut above the rest: How ‘most stylish Stone’ Charlie Watts had two tailors, owned more than 200 suits and felt ‘out of place’ with his scruffy bandmates

  • Rolling Stone drummer Charlie Watts, who died yesterday aged 80, was called ‘best dressed Rolling Stone’
  • He never succumbed to the ragged style associated with the rock legends  and owned more than 200 suits
  • Often pictured in a sharp three-piece suit and tie, even when on stage, Charlie always looked cool and collected despite the chaos of the Swingin’ Sixties

At the height of their fame, the Rolling Stones were known for their shabby style, colourful clothing, tight trousers and all round scruffiness.

Setting trends across the world, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood became as known for the way they dressed as for their music, with millions copying their dishevelled looks and sporting tight jeans, open collar shirts and messy mullets – as London’s fashion set and beyond dropped the rigid style rules of the 1950s for a decade of hedonism, mini skirts, and platform heels.

But drummer Charlie Watts, who died yesterday aged 80, famously never succumbed to the ragged style that’s so associated with his bandmates – and owned more than 200 suits.

Often pictured in a sharp three-piece suit and tie, even when on stage, Charlie always looked cool and collected despite the chaos of the Swinging Sixties.

His style is that of a ‘quintessential English gentlemen’ according to celebrity stylist Rochelle White, who today praised him for not wearing head-to-toe designer like many rock stars. Despite his fame and fortune, Charlie kept a humble wardrobe with a ‘few Prada raincoats’ and items from Ralph Lauren complementing  mostly unknown designers. 

GQ – generally regarded as the bible for men’s fashion – dubbed Charlie the ‘most stylish stone’ in 2012. 

At the height of their fame, the Rolling Stones were known for their shabby style, colourful clothing, tight trousers and all round scruffiness. He is pictured in 1964

Drummer Charlie Watts, who died yesterday aged 80, famously never succumbed to the ragged style that’s so associated with the rock legends – and owned more than 200 suits. He is pictured in 1975

Often pictured in a sharp three-piece suit and tie, even when on stage, Charlie always looked cool and collected despite the chaos of the Swingin’ Sixties. Pictured in 1996

His style is that of a ‘quintessential English gentlemen’ according to celebrity stylist Rochelle White, who today praised him for not wearing head-to-toe designer like many rock stars. Despite his fame and fortune, Charlie kept a humble wardrobe with a ‘few Prada raincoats’ and items from Ralph Lauren complementing mostly unknown designers. He is pictured in 2004

GQ – generally regarded as the bible for men’s fashion – dubbed Charlie the ‘most stylish stone’ in 2012. He is pictured in 2011, aged 70

‘Charlie Watts’ style has been the quintessential English gentleman from his rock and roll days through to his death,’ Rochelle told FEMAIL. 

‘His early life was rooted in jazz music and that scene inspired his look and how he dressed his whole life.

‘He had an effortless way and dressing and also had this way of looking cool and collected in everything he chose to wear.

‘Looking back on his style he always wore well tailored suits, shirts and trousers. 

‘Charlie was known for having his suits made, as he had two tailors based in London. 

‘He had a thing for brogues and notched lapels on double breasted suits. 

‘He never really wore designers compared to most celebrities, and he would sometimes opt for a three piece suit and tailoring when he was travelling with his band.

‘You could see his style in the suits that he wore, with thick and thin pinstripes and even pastel colours.   

Setting trends across the world, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood became as known for the way they dressed as much as their music, with millions copying their dishevelled looks and sporting tight jeans, open collar shirts and messy mullets – as London’s fashion set and beyond dropped the rigid style rules of the 1950s for a decade of hedonism, mini skirts, and platform heels. Left to right: Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ronnie Wood, Mick Jagger, Bill Wyman

Charlie Watts’ style has been the quintessential English gentleman from his rock and roll days through to his death, according to a celebrity stylist. Charlie is pictured in 2007

Charlie, pictured in 1966, even sported a suit while on stage, while his bandmates succumbed to the messy looks trendy in the sixities

Dressed in his best! Charlie, pictured at Royal Ascot in 2010, was never far away from a suit and owned more than 200 across his homes

Pictures show the London-born drummer’s commitment to his sharp style from an early age – with one photo of him at just two years old showing he already had sartorial prowess.  

The photo, taken in 1943, which was featured as part of childhood photos & memorabilia of the Rolling Stones ahead of their ‘Exhibitionism’ at London’s Saatchi Gallery, showed him with his Lillian and father Charles in Piccadilly Circus.

Sporting a beret, double breasted jacket, and shining shoes – it’s no surprise he grew up to be a style icon. 

Discussing his own style in 2012, Charlie, then 71, said he had a ‘very old-fashioned’ and ‘traditional mode of dress’.  

‘I get embarrassed, and I don’t really like going to photo shoots. I don’t like stylists. If you were Fred Astaire, you wore something and you had it on all day. It wasn’t just put on you, which is what a stylist does. So I always felt totally out of place with the Rolling Stones,’ he told GQ.

‘Not as a person—they never made me feel like that. I just mean the way I looked. Photos of the band would come back—I’ll have a pair of shoes on and they’ve got trainers. I hate trainers, even if they’re fashionable. I mean, I like fashion, because it pushes it and bends it around, but it takes a long while to get to this point—if you’re that interested in being at this point, where you understand what works for you. And so while I love fashion—I go to all the shops regularly, wherever I am—I have to adapt it to myself, but nothing fits me cause I’m too small, so I’ll look at the clothes, then go back and try to adapt them. And as I’ve gotten older, there are particular things I like and don’t like—little things’.

Pictures show the London-born drummer’s commitment to his sharp style from an early age – with one photo of him at just two years old showing he already had sartorial prowess. The photo, taken in 1943, which was featured as part of childhood photos & memorabilia of the Rolling Stones ahead of their ‘Exhibitionism’ at London’s Saatchi Gallery, showed him with his Lillian and father Charles in Piccadilly Circus. Sporting a beret, double breasted jacket, and shining shoes – it’s no surprise he grew up to be a style icon.

Poised and perfected: Unlike his bandmates Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, the legendary drummer managed to stay out of the tabloids but throughout his life was pictured looking suave on hundreds of occasions. He is pictured in 1986

Unlike his bandmates Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, the legendary drummer  managed to stay out of the tabloids but throughout his life was pictured looking suave on hundreds of occasions. 

‘I’ve never been interested in doing interviews or being seen,’ he told NME. ‘I love it and I do interviews because I want people to come and see the band. The Rolling Stones exist because people come to the shows…’ 

The death of the London-born drummer was announced on Tuesday – with a statement saying he had ‘passed away peacefully in hospital surrounded by his family’.

Ronnie Wood, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards lead an outpouring of grief following the news, with Ronnie, 74, sharing a picture of the pair with the caption: ‘I love you my fellow Gemini ~ I will dearly miss you ~you are the best’. 

Rolling Stones frontman Mick, 78, shared a poignant photo of a smiling Charlie on both Twitter and Instagram, without a caption, while guitarist Keith, 77, posted a Twitter photo of the Rolling Stones’ drum kit with a ‘closed’ sign hanging from it. 

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