#Stayhome guide for Thursday: Listen to a local jazz concert, check out an easy recipe for a healthy wolfberry dish

1 LISTEN: A LOCAL JAZZ CONCERT


(From far left) Musicians Rit Xu, Randy Brecker (standing), Shawn Letts and CC Lee at the Lion City Youth Jazz Festival in May 2018, organised by the Jazz Association (Singapore). PHOTO: JAZZ ASSOCIATION (SINGAPORE)

Celebrate Unesco International Jazz Day by catching a free online concert by the Jazz Association (Singapore), or Jass, at 8.30pm tonight.

Jass @ Home will feature seasoned jazz musicians and performers such as pianist Jeremy Monteiro and singer Alemay Fernandez.

The association has held free community concerts to celebrate Unesco International Jazz Day in April since 2018.

This year’s show has been moved online, so viewers can enjoy it during the circuit breaker period.

The concert will be broadcast on The Straits Times’ Facebook page, YouTube and Twitter channels as well as Jass’ social media channels.

Info: Jass’ website or The Straits Times’ channels (youtube.com/user/StraitsTimesOnline; facebook.com/TheStraitsTimes; twitter.com/STcom)

2 WATCH: PROJECT INFINITUDE


Singaporean conductor Wong Kah Chun with students from Child at Street 11 as part of Project Infinitude. PHOTO: CHILD AT STREET 11, WONG KAH CHUN

Catch this digital series on Project Infinitude, an educational musical initiative founded by Singaporean music conductor Kahchun Wong (in black).

Together with Child at Street 11, a charity and pre-school for children from diverse and under-privileged backgrounds, the project provides an inclusive space for children to explore classical music.

The episodes are narrated by Wong and Nirmala Murugaian, director of Child at Street 11, bringing viewers along the children’s musical journey.

The first episode, available now, offers a glimpse of the activities and impact of Project Infinitude. Subsequent episodes will air every Thursday on ST’s website and social media channels.

Info: straitstimes.com, youtube.com/user/StraitsTimesOnline

3 DISCOVER: CHANGE ALLEY CLOSES FOR REDEVELOPMENT


Change Alley was historically known not just as a thriving bazaar and marketplace for Asian goods and services, but also for its numerous money changers. PHOTO: GEORGE TRICKER COLLECTION, NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF SINGAPORE

Delve into the past and learn about Singapore’s transformation over the years.

Sitting between Raffles Place and Collyer Quay, Change Alley was a meeting point for locals and foreign traders to barter goods and conduct business. It was also a bustling thoroughfare for pedestrians walking from the seafront to Raffles Place.

Over the decades, the alley became known for souvenirs and handicrafts as well as money exchange services. The shops closed after clearance sales in April 1989.

The revamped space was unveiled in 1993 as an air-conditioned shopping arcade flanked by Caltex House (now Chevron House) and Hitachi Tower (now 16 Collyer Quay).

Find out more at: str.sg/JM9J & str.sg/JMvs

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4 Comfort cooking: Easy, healthy wolfberry dish


Stir-fried wolfberry leaves with wolfberries, seasoned with oyster sauce. ST PHOTO: HEDY KHOO

Tired of eating the same old vegetables like caixin and kailan? Try whipping up this simple dish of stir-fried wolfberry leaves with wolfberries.

Wolfberries are believed to be beneficial for the eyes, liver and kidneys in traditional Chinese medicine. Wolfberry leaves – known as gou qi ye in Mandarin and gao kee cai in Teochew – are edible.

READ MORE HERE

5 Tar Pau Nation: Good chicken briyani that keeps well 


(From top) Bhindi Palli Fry, Prawn Masala and Kampong Chicken Biryani from Mr Biryani. ST PHOTO: WONG AH YOKE

When it comes to food that travels well, Indian cuisine is definitely high on the list.

Many of the dishes require long, slow cooking that retains heat well.

Even if they have gone cold, they can be reheated easily or microwaved with little loss in quality.

READ MORE HERE

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