Mother shares life raising twiblings who were born five months apart

‘Anyone who loves him as much as us is welcome in our lives’: The ultimate modern family has regular visits with the birth mother of the ‘little legend’ adopted boy who has bonded with his ‘twibling’

  • Mother reveals how she’s raising ‘twiblings’ who were born five months apart 
  • Jonica and Clint Williams, both aged 40, are proud parents of three children
  • They call the boys ‘twiblings’ – one is biological and the other is adopted
  • It’s far from the traditional set up but Hendry has become a part of the family 

A mother has revealed how she’s raising ‘twiblings’ who were born five months apart.

Jonica and Clint Williams, both aged 40, are proud parents of three children – 11-year-old daughter Caja and two-year-old sons Jonty and Hendry.

The writer gave birth to her second child Jonty on October 5, 2016 – and while the Australian family were on a gap year in Vanuatu, they legally adopted Hendry in April 2018.

It’s far from the traditional set up but little Hendry, who was born on March 3, 2017, has become a part of this modern family.

‘Hendry looks very different to the rest of us and people are curious but are too polite to ask. So that’s when I started calling them “twiblings”, telling people we are a proud adoptive family,’ Mrs Williams told Daily Mail Australia.

Jonty (left) was born in October 2016 while his ‘twibling’ brother Hendry was born March 2017

Jonica and Clint Williams, both aged 40, are proud parents of three children – 11-year-old daughter Caja (far right) and two-year-old sons Jonty (centre) and Hendry (far left)

‘I use those words very carefully because I want it to be inclusive. I don’t say we adopted Hendry. I don’t want him to feel like he is always being singled out. 

‘And equally so I don’t want Caja and Jonty to feel like he always gets the attention from new people.’

The idea to adopt arose unexpectedly when the family were living in Vanuatu between June 2017 and May 2018.

‘When I was on maternity leave with Jonty we decided to take some time out and move to Vanuatu,’ she said. 

‘I had never done a gap year or any extensive travelling when I was younger so I figured having a year off was the perfect time to try something new. 

‘The house we rented came with a local lady who helped out with everything from teaching us “Bislama” the local language and showing us around her island paradise.

‘It was only a couple of weeks after arriving that she asked us if we would consider adopting a baby and needless to say we were taken aback.’

Sibling love! The mother said she been raising her ‘twiblings’ who were born five months apart

Since living back at home in Sydney, Mrs Williams said Hendry has settled in very well with the family as they still stay in full contact with his birth mother

It’s far from the traditional set up but Hendry has become a part of the ultimate modern family

The family were told the single mother was struggling to raise the child on her own so she made the tough decision to put her baby Hendry up for adoption.

‘It’s very common in Vanuatu for family or friends to help out with raising your children and is widely celebrated with custom ceremonies,’ Mrs Williams said.

‘Once the shock had worn off, we were actually excited by the idea of adding to our family. We knew we wanted another baby eventually and were certainly open to the idea of adoption.’

The following day, Mrs Williams and her husband Clint, who’s a cameraman, met with the then-seven-month-old baby Hendry and his mother.

‘I fell head over heels in love the moment I saw his chubby little grin,’ she said.

‘I went back and forth for a number of weeks getting to know Hendry and his family, the village chief and pretty much everyone else you can think of.’

The family were on a gap year in Vanuatu when they decided to adopt their now son Hendry

The mother-of-three said her children treat little Hendry like any other member of their family

Mrs Williams said she ‘fell head over heels in love the moment she saw his ‘chubby little grin’

The family went to the High Court in Vanuatu to find out the legalities involved with the adoption process.

‘The adoption process wasn’t easy. And rightly so because the safety of children should always be a priority,’ Mrs Williams said.

‘We applied for police checks from Australia, and other places we had lived before. We had sessions with a psychologist and many appointments at court.  

‘We went though rigorous medical exams and health checks and had to provide proof we were financially stable. 

‘Even though Vanuatu law is for a closed adoption we made a private agreement with the mother to have an open adoption. That means she very much remains a part of our lives and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

‘She made a huge, selfless and brave decision placing Hendry for adoption. She put his needs above her own and there was no way I was going to wipe that woman from his life.’

Playtime! The little boys spending a day at the beach – just one of many memories together

The doting mother-of-three said her children treat little Hendry like any other sibling

The adoption process in Vanuatu took about six months before they were finally allowed to bring him back to Australia with a new addition to their household

The adoption process in Vanuatu took about six months before they were finally allowed to bring him back to Australia with a new addition to their household. 

‘The first night he came to live with us was just awful. He cried and cried and nothing I could do would settle him,’ she said. 

‘I had spent lots of time with him at the village before. But this was all new. New smells. A new house. A new family. And my heart broke for him.

‘I just held him in my arms until he fell asleep and lay there all night sobbing for my beautiful baby. But thankfully that was the only night he cried. And luckily we have had a smooth ride since with many special moments along the way.’

The mother-of-three said her children treat little Hendry like any other sibling.

‘Caja became like a second mum to her little brothers and loves playing with them both. She even changes nappies,’ she said. 

‘Hendry and Jonty became brothers and best friends instantly. They adore each other one minute and fight over the smallest things the next.’ 

The twibling brothers were born five months apart – and are now living together in Sydney

 Building fond memories! The mum has been documenting her loving family life on Instagram

Since living back at home in Sydney, Mrs Williams said Hendry has settled in very well with the family as they still stay in full contact with his birth mother

The mother-of-three said her children treat little Hendry like any other member of their family

Since living back at home in Sydney, Mrs Williams said Hendry has settled in very well with the family as they still stay in full contact with his birth mother. 

‘I learnt a lot about managing my time and the boys. The importance of one on one time. The fact that the cleaning can wait and it’s ok not to do it all,’ she said.  

‘People often say Hendry is lucky to have been adopted by a family like ours. But in all honesty that makes me feel uneasy. Having Hendry in our lives has been nothing short of wonderful.

‘He is a little legend bringing us so much joy. We are the lucky ones. And his mother is still very much a big part of our lives. We have been back to see her and she has even come to Australia for a holiday and stayed with us. We talk and text daily. 

‘I often feel like I kind of adopted her too. I tell Hendry every day that we love him and that his Muma loves him too. Jonty has even started calling her “Muma” and she really loves that. 

‘Since the adoption she has got a job and is saving money to build a small house and I’m really proud of her. Hendry still calls her mum. And I hope he always will because she is his mum and anyone who loves him as much as us is welcome in our lives.’

To follow their remarkable journey, please visit The WanderTwins.

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